Slow burning using wood or a coal derivative can prematurely corrode your flue liner or flue system

According to the SFA (Solid Fuel Association), slow burning, where stoves are kept slumbering overnight, or when they are generally run cool (being connected to a boiler was an example mentioned) can give rise to condensation in the liner, resulting in the production of hydrochloric and sulphuric acid.

The original grade of stainless steel offered for chimney lining (it’s known as ‘316’) came with a ten year guarantee, but where stoves were driven in this way, it was found that the liners were sometimes not lasting even that long. More recently, a more substantial grade has been offered with a 25 year guarantee (904 grade).

The issue of condensation will not come as news per se to seasoned stove users as it has long been said that wood condensation can cause similar problems, now its known coal derivatives can also cause this problem – again, especially if a stove is under-driven

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